Stress+RA=Swelling

I subbed up at the school yesterday as the librarian.  Some days are quite quiet up there, but Tuesday’s are her big day: 6 classes back to back with a little break to eat & shelve books in the middle.  The regular teachers like to use library time as a place to park the kids while they go off and do other things, so it’s all up to the librarian to get the kids through a lesson and finding books and checking out and then time in the computer lab.  (Some teachers do stay close by, but busy.  One actually stayed and helped, which I LOVE her for.)  By the time the third period had gone through my hands were swollen up big enough that the bigger sized rings that I was wearing were too small for me.  (I need to remember to get them out of my wallet still.)

 

Anyhow, my day wasn’t over then.  Middle boy had dance class, then both the older boys had piano lessons, then we came home and did all the days chores (we’re trying out choremonster.com, by the way.  It’s a bit of a beast to set up, but the kids are LOVING it so far), the dishwasher overflowed all over the kitchen so we had to clean up that, and my husband finally came home from the meeting at the middle school that I was supposed to attend (but was too tired to).  We ate leftovers for dinner.  Yeah.

 

And today we do it all over again!  Though with less after school craziness.  So glad today is Wednesday.

It’s Wednesday, so naturally I flare

Next week there can’t be any crisis. My schedule is already full.

-Henry Kissinger

I don’t know about you, but I categorize events in my life this way: Important, Necessary, I’d like to go, and Enh.  Each has a few things permanently attached to it, but some things waver back and forth between categories.

Important includes things like our PTA Open House this week.  PTA stuff usually falls into the category of Necessary, but this event is the big opening of our new school.  Important also covers Family Dinners (with my in-laws) and certain doctor appointments (neurologist, rheumatologist).

Necessary covers things like our two monthly MOPS meetings and regular kid check-ups and weekly church.

I’d Like to Go is the stuff that usually falls by the wayside, sadly.  It’s the coffees, playdates, Ladies Club, trips to the gourmet food store, parties, etc. that I put on the calendar hopefully, but then have to cancel because I’m exhausted or in pain or have succumbed to yet another sinus infection.

Enh, of course, is that stuff that I don’t really want to do, don’t really need to do, but someone somewhere asked me and it’s important to them, so I’ll do it.  I generally end up doing these things rather than the I’d Like to Go things, somehow, usually because I’m propelled by the momentum of wanting to make someone else happy.

So this morning is MOPS and I’m in charge of hospitality, which involves setting things up, making things pretty, doing some MC’ing, and then tearing it all down again.  That is why MOPS falls in the Necessary category for this year.  I’ve missed the last two meetings due to various illnesses and today is my hospitality co-person to be sick, so of course I’ve flared and can barely walk.  Of course.  But I’m going and will sit and direct people, if necessary, perched on  a stool in the front of the room.  Woo hoo.

More about me…

…cause it’s all about me.  😉  Just kidding, but I thought you’d like to know a bit more about me than I put on my About Me page.

On the RA front, I was diagnosed with RA five years ago after dealing with various symptoms for the last 10 years (numbness & tingling?  check.  six trillion cases of bursitis, tendinitis, etc? check.  Jaw pain when chewing?  Check.  Mysterious chest pain neither heart related nor lung related? check.).  I’ve tried various combinations of hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), sulfasalazine (Azulfidine), methotextrate (Rheumatrex), etanercept (Enbrel), celecoxib (Celebrex), prednisone, and golimumab (Simponi).  I usually last about a year on one of the big drugs before having to add in something else and eventually giving up on it, as my system ends up getting immune to stuff fairly quickly.  I’m currently taking methotextrate, Celebrex, & Simponi (along with a daily woman’s multi-vitamin, omega-3 with DHA, fiber pills, and folic acid).  I spend about four months (not concurrently) of the year needing extra support, like wrist & finger & knee & ankle braces, etc, while the rest of the year I can get by with just the usual adjustments (ergonomic kitchen tools, extra stools throughout the house for legs & feet, pumped shampoos & soaps, special keyboard & mouse & pens, etc).

In regular life, I am technically called a stay at home mom (hereon referred to as SAHM).  That being said, I am a regular volunteer at my older children’s school, on the substitute list for my youngest child’s Mother’s Day Out (hereon referred to as MDO), on the steering team of my local Mothers of Preschoolers (hereon referred to as MOPS), a member of a monthly book club (no longer running it, yay!), and I help out with the kids Sabbath School every week or so (whenever they have it).  All of which is a long way of saying that I don’t actually get home a whole lot  unless we’re sick.

I have a husband, who’s an engineer in the petroleum industry, & three boy children.  The husband is awesome.  He’s like a superhero who takes care of a sick wife & the kids when the wife is sick & still manages to do great at work & try to save the environment in his spare time.  The kids are awesome, too.  The oldest is a third grader who’s obsessed with all things Star Wars and math/science.  The middle one is a kindergartener who loves everything and everyone and is constantly making presents for everybody.  The youngest is three and has hit that hysterically funny stage and will climb anything at all, no fear.

I’m also a scrapbooker, an avid reader, a jewelry designer (when I get commissions), and an aspiring novelist (these days I write YA Fantasy; I also write poetry & short fiction).  So, when I am home, I am busy there as well.  I don’t really have time to really think a whole lot about my RA.  Who really has time for a chronic disease, though?